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H 



CULL 



College flews 



Vol. 10. No. 26 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 1911 



Price 5 Cents 



THE GERMAN PLAY. 



The members of the Deutscher Verein arc 

certainly to be congratulated upon the per- 
formance of the Faust Puppenspiel, at the 
Barn, the evening of April 24. The play 
itself has had an interesting history, the 
original being given during the first half of 
the seventeenth century. It was not written 
down, however, until its restoration by Karl 
Simroek, years later. As it is, it is the con- 
necting link between Marlowe's Dr. FaustUS 
and Goethe's drama, based on the German 
Volksbuch, given in Dresden in [626. A 
century and a half later, Goethe came to 
know it when it was transplanted to the Ger- 
man stage through puppet play. 

The story shows Faust, disappointed in 
his studies, about to call up the spirits of Hell, 
when his Famulus Wagner brings word that 
some students have just arrived with a book 
of magic. Faust is greatly excited over this 
news when Kasperle, the clown, appi 
thinking Faust's home an inn. He is en- 
gaged as Wagner's servant. 

The second act shows Faust conjuring up 
the spirits to make a compact with Mephis- 
tophelis. It is agreed that he shall have 
Faust's soul and body in return for twenty- 
four years of service, wherein Faust is to en- 
joy pleasure and knowledge. Faust and 
Mephistopheles begin their new can er by a 
trip to the Court of Parma. Kasperle, un- 
willing to be left behind, conjures up the 
devils and gets them to take him to Parma, 
without the promise of either his soul or body. 

The third act shows Faust leading his new- 
life at the Court of Parma, where he has 
fallen in love with the Duchess of Parma. 
He is, however, forced to flee on account of 
the Duke's jealousy. Kasperle has by this 
time aroused the indignation of both Hell 
and the people and flees also. 

The fourth act is laid in Mainz twelve 
years later, when Faust, bitterly disappi anted, 
has repented and is about to be saved, but 
Mephistopheles tempts him again with 
Helen of Troy. Faust falls again and re- 
ceives her, only to find her a devilish decep- 
tion. At this juncture Mephistopheles ap- 
pears to say that Faust's time is up, be 
the former has served out the twenty-four 
years in serving day and night for twelve 
years. Out of the dark midnight the devils 
appear and carry Faust off to Hell. 

Dorothy Summy as Faust showed a 
splendid reserve of power, particularly in the 
intensely dramatic climaetical ending. 

Cathrene Peebles got excellently into the 
part, giving a vivid, clever, and thoroughly 
amusing presentation. 

Annie Clark carried off the part of Meph- 
istopheles very well, with diabolic voice. 



significant gestures, and a most blood-curd- 
ling laugh. 

The resl of th 1 tsl was very good, es- 
pecially Ruth Perkins, Lib Zimmerman and 
Rachel Keator. Dorothy Summy, Annie 
Clark and Lili Zimmerman spoke excellent 
German throughout the play. 

Tile committee is to be congratulated on 
th tagingoftl : play, and the simple though 
effective sci nery. 

Tin 1 
Fausi Dorothy Summy 

Christoph Wagner; his Famulus 

Lili Zimmcrmann 
Duke of Parma Ruth Perry 

Duchess of Parma Rachel Keator 

Don Carlos, s ineschal at the Court of Par- 
ma Ruth Perkins 
Kasperle, Faust's servant, afterwards night 
watchman Cathrene Peebles 



Devils: 

Mephistopheles 

Vitzliputzli 

Polimor 

Asmodeus 

As] 

Cuerhahn 

Haribax 

.\ I cgara 
Faust's Guardian Angel 
Helen of Troy 
A fiery dragon 

Committee: Dorothy Summy, Chairman. 
Emma Bus~, Marita Lincoln, Louise Husted, 
Elizabeth Allbright. Eleanor Wheeler, Maud 
Davis. 

G ch: Ida Brooks. 



Annie Clark 

Ruth Edwards 

Hertha Bonning 

Edna Fisce 

Kathcrinc Pardee 

Bertha Schcdler 

Norah Foote 

Ma. rion Jewett 

Edith Allyn 

Helen Lamprey 



LECTURE BY MISS ABBOTT. 



Miss Abbott of the Art Department lec- 
tured to two divisions of History ,^, Wednes- 
day aiternoon, April 2(>, in the Geology Lec- 
ture Room on "Renaissance Ait as the Ex- 
pression of Renaissance Id 

Mediaeval art was, in general, artificial 
and overstrained, bound by set formulas, both 
artistic and ecclesiastic. The dawning free- 
dom from these restraints first found ex- 
pression in the work of Giotto in the early 
fourteenth century. It was especially fitting, 
Miss Abbott said, that Giotto's name should 
be associated with his scenes from the life 
of St. Francis, for while St. Francis infused 
a human quality into Mediaeval religion, 
Giotto infused a human quality into Mediae- 
val art. Giotto's "Flight into Egypt" is 
one of the first pictures that shows the 
realism and the sympathy with e\ 
It: lian life that came into art at tin bi gin 
ning of the Italian Renaissance. In the next 



Ci miiry, the work of Boticelli gave full ex- 
pression to lb,- true Ri ■ spirit — 

■ tally to that strange double-faced mo 
ment, the mingling of Pagan and Chri 1 
elements. The curiously modern Italian 
Renaissance atmosphere and form thai he 
brought into his interpretation of <b 
myths is strikingly apparent in his "Birth of 
Venus," and is a note eminently characteris- 
tic of the period. 

With the death of Lorenzo Medici in 1492, 
the preeminence in art passi dto Rome, where 
it flourished under the patronage of the 
Popes. With Rome an- associated the three 
great names of sixteenth century art, Raphael, 
Michael Angelo and Leonardo da Vinci. 
St. Peter's and the frescoes of the Vatican 
nt the monuments of Raphael's creative gen- 
ius. Michael Angelo *s great work in painting 
is seen in the frescoes of the Sistine Chapel, 
the "Creation" and the "Fall 1 if Man." In his 
painting, we feel power, energy and conflict, 
a great mind at war with his time. With 
Leonardo da Vinci, we come to a distinct 
representation of the mind of the Renais- 
sance. With all his versatility, inventive 
genius, and intellectual power, Leonardo 
had a deep psychological insight into the 
spirit of his time. The deeply thoughtful, 
enigmatic face of "Mona Lisa" expresses 
the whole spirit of the Renaissance. The 
"Last Supper" also shows the deep mystery 
and spiritual quality in his art. 

In Venice the sixteenth century developed 
a less profound expression of art, exultant, 
full of freedom, joy in life, and rich, sensuous 
color. Giorgione was an early exponent of 
this phase. In his work we note that man is 
sharing his dominance with nature — that 
landscapes are assuming distinct prominence 
in the picture. Imagination, emotion, poetry, 
mood, are the characteristic elements in 
Giorgione's art — notably in his painting of 
Venus. Titian, the pupil of Giorgione, be- 
longs, in the early part of his life, to this same 
school of exuberant expression of art. To 
this period belong his portrait of Arioste 
anil the "Bacchus and Ariadne." But 
greater energy and abandon appear in his 
later pictures. The final note of the Renais- 
sance is struck in the paintings of Veronese, 
the "Virgin Enthroned," and "Venice En- 
throned," the secularization of religious sub- 

1'''!-. 

1912 ELECTIONS. 

The Class of 1912, on April 27, made the 
following elections: 

Senior President: Helen K. Goss. 

Literary Editor of the Legenda: Norah 
V. Foot. 

Silver Bay Delegate: Grace Slack. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Colle ge IR ews. 

Press of N. A. Lindsey a Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, $1.00 a 
year to resident and non-resident. 

All business correspondence should be addressed 
to Ridie Guion, Business Manager. College News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Miss Helen 
Goodwin. 

All advertising correspondence should be addressed 
to Miss B. M. Beckford, Wellesley. 



Editor-in-Chief, Muriel Bacheler, igi2 

Associate Editor, Cathrene H. Peebles, 1912 

Literary Editors, 

Sarah W. Parker, 1913 Helen Logan, 1013 

Reporters, 
Kathleen Burnett, 1913 Carol Prentice, 1913 

Alumn.e Editor, Sarah J. Woodward, 1905 
Business Manager, Ridie Guion, 191 1 

Subscription Editor, Helen Goodwin, 191 1 
Assistants, 
Frances Gray, 1912 Josephine Guion, 1913 

Advertising Manager. Bertha M. Beckford 



"Entered as second class matter, November 12, 
1903, at the Post-Office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3, 1879-" 



EDITORIAL. 



Introspection is not a pleasant word, it is 
so uncomfortably big and vague, but, all the 
same, it is comprehensive, and, after its 
own fashion, expressive. So, because it is 
the only word quite big enough to express 
what I mean, in spite of all your frowns and 
grimaces I am going to call you introspective. 
(Don't shrug your shoulders with a sarcastic 
reference to "glass-houses," for the writer 
doesn't forget that she is a part of the big 
college with you and therefore shares in the 
epithet.) 

Think of the extreme case, the girl that 
yuu know, who, weighing the comparative 
value of a walk around the lake and an after- 
noon at the library, acts always with due 
consideration; who analyzes her relationships 
with her friends and their exact influence 
upon her, ending, perhaps, with grave doubts 
as to whether this or that friend is quite 
suited to her particular temperament; who 
is always deeply engrossed in some problem, 
either personal or abstract, always engaged 
in the analysis and evaluation of her sur- 
roundings, her opportunities, and her own 



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inherent qualities. There are not many 
quite like this, but the fact still remains that 
we make a fetish of Reason — we, a number big 
enough to represent that long suffering- 
mortal, the "type of the college girl." Far 
be it from any of us to disparage the great 
god Reason, but — everything in its place and 
everything in proper measure! Just because 
we wrote a forensic once upon a time, we do 
not have to draw up a mental clash of opinion 
for every act of the day. Just because we 
may have taken a course in psychology we 
don't have to account for every characteristic, 
every source of action in each person that we 
meet. 

You remember, perhaps, the story of the 
man at the breakfast -table who sagely re- 
marked, "All women look at the world from 
a purely personal point of view." "I don't," 
promptly remonstrated his wife. I'll wager 
that most of you are saying "I don't" to all 
this with a good strong emphasis on the per- 
sonal pronoun. That's what introspection 
is — the personal view of life. With unconscious 
egoism, we place ourselves in the center of 
the circle and vainly perplex our philosophic 
mind with the impossible task of working out 
the system of relationship between our all- 
important self at the center and everything, 
every person, every thought, outside. We 
should hotly resent being called self-centered, 
because we're most of us busy, at the very 
time, reasoning out when, why and how to 
be unselfish. We feel mightily virtuous — 
"There's the rub!" 

So then, to come to the point, this is a 
place for what Matthew Arnold calls "spon- 
taneity of consciousness;" a place for spon- 
taneous, light-hearted, enthusiastic living — 
recklessness, if you like; and, finally, a plea 
for straightforward unselfishness, so direct 
and unconscious that it is nothing but just 
forgetting to be unselfish. And so, let's not 
forget that we were all children on May Day 
— that we all know how to play, and then — 
let's play! And, yes, let's all go to step-sing 
to-night! 

VESPER SERVICE. 



Together with all the Protestant churches 
of the United States, the college observed 
Sunday, April 23, as the tercentenaryjcelebra- 
tion of the translation of the King James 
Bible. The vesper service was set apart for 
this observance. Miss Kendrick, the leader 
of the service, spoke briefly in appreciation 
of the beauty of this translation, and, at the 
same time, recalled the memory of the great 
forerunners of the King James translators, 
Wyclif and Tyndale. Following this, Pro- 
fessor BenneU of the Elocution Department, 



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read with beautiful simplicity and effective- 
ness a number of the notable passages from 
the King James version, showing its won- 
derful dignity, its dramatic power, and its 
high poetic quality. The passages chosen 
were: (1) II Samuel 12: 1-15, the parable told 
by the prophet Nathan in reproof of David 
the king; (2) II Samuel 18, the story of 
Absalom's death and David's grief, a story 
full of vivid incident and deep pathos; (3) 
Ecclesiastes 12: 1-8, that wonderfully sonorous 
passage so full of imagery, beginning "Re- 
member thy Creator in the days of thy youth;" 
(4) Job 28, a poetic passage rich in color and 
diction; (5) a part of the prophecy of Amos, 
taken from the fourth chapter; (6) Revela- 
tion 5, one of the vivid Apocalyptic visions 
of John. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 




Ladies' 
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Over the English Tea Room. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

Saturday, May 6, at 7.30 P.M., in the Barn, Barn-wallow-. 
Sunday, May 7, at 11.00 A.M., service in Houghton Memorial 
Chapel. Sermon by Dr. N. W. Cadwell of Atlantic City, New 

Jersey. 

At 7.00 P.M., Vespers. 
Monday, May 8, at 7.30 P.M., at the Agora House, an informal 
meeting of the Equal Suffrage League. The speaker will be 
Miss Sophie Hart. The meeting is open to all members of th e 
League. 

COLLEGE NOTES. 



Professor Prances M. Perry, formerly of the Department of 
English at Wellesley, now in the University of Arizona, has accepted 
an invitation from the University of California to give two courses 
in English at the summer session, this year. Professor Perry ex- 
pects to visit the Yosemite before returning to the University of 
Arizona, in the autumn. 

The Department of Hygiene ami Physical Educatii in, announces 
the appointment from the Class of 191 1 of: 

Mary Whitmore to the Hollidaysburg School for Girls, Holli- 
daysburg, Pa. 

May Kissock to Smith College. 

Susan Penniman to Chicago University Summer School. 

Katherine Eastman to Margaret Morrison Carnegie School, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



The French Academy (Inscriptions et Belles-Let ties,) at its 
meeting of March 24, 191 1, awarded a prize of live hundred francs 
to M. Albert Feuillerat, for the excellence of his critical study: — 
John Lily, Contribution a l'Histoire de las Renaissance en Angleterre. 

The present generation of French scholars is active in research 
in the field of English Literature in which Voltaire led the way and 
Taine won distinction. 

NOTICES. 



Professor Colin has received the official announcements of 
Summer Courses in various French universities and will gladly 
give further information to students who may be interested in un- 
dertaking such practical work under the best conditions. 




FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND HOTHOUSE PRODUCTS 

SPECIAL ATTENTION dlVEN TO HOTEL, CLUB AND FAMILY ORDERS 

ISAAC LOCKE & CO. 

97, 99 and 101 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



WELLESLEY NATIONAL BANK. 

LETTERS OF CREDIT 

TRAVELLERS' CHECKS 

We can save you time, annoyance 
and money, on your trip abroad. 



CHARLES N. TAYLOR. Pres. BENJAMIN H. SANBORN. Vlce-Pres. 

B. W. GUERNSEY, Cashier. 



A graduate of an American college, an Evangelical Protestant, 

in sympathy with mission work, preferably one who can teat hn u ii 
is wanted as a teacher for four children, representing two missionary 
families, and ranging in age from nine to sixteen, in a mission post 
in Syria. 

One teacher remained four years in this position and another 
nearly three years. A full statement of details regarding the position 
and the contract, can lie seen at No. 130 College Hall. 



Tickets for T. Z. E. Studio Reception (May 13. 1911), will be 
on sale at the Elevator Table, Friday, May 5, and Tuesday, May 9. 
Price, 50 cents. 

ART EXHIBITIONS. 



MUSEUM of Fine Arts: Work of Boston Artists. 
Museum of Fine Arts: Egyptian Antiquities. 
Copley Gallery: Mr. Smith's Pictures. 
Cobh's Gallery: Mr. Kingsbury's Water-colors. 
Boston Art Club: Boston Camera Club Exhibition. 
New Gallery: Paintings by Boston Artists. 
Vose's Gallery: Greenwood and Stevens' Exhibit. 
Arts and Crafts: Exhibition of Pottery. 
Copley Gallery: Mrs. Peabody's Pastels. 



Herrick, Copley square, Back Bay, has the best seats for all 
theaters. Telephones, 2329, 2330, 2331, Back Bay. 



RESOLUTIONS OF THE CLASS OF 1913. 

Whereas we, the members of the Class of 1913, have suffered 
a great loss thn mgh the death of our friend and classmate, Josephine 
Harper, 

Be it resolved, that we extend our heartfelt sympathy to her 
family in their greater bereavement, in appreciation of her love for 
her class and college, and 

Be it resi lived, (hat we express our grief to the students, through 
the College News, and to her family by sending a written copy 
of these words. 

Signed, Helen R. Martin, 

Marcia Kerr, 

For the Class. 



Every Requisite for a 

DAINTY LUNCH 

AT 

COBB, BATES & YERXA CO. 

55 to 61 Summer Street 

(Only One Block from Washington Street.) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Tel. 4092 Back Bay 



I.S. Rosen & Bros. ta , LO r S 

Special Attention Paid to Weilesley Students 



H. G. L A F? P E E , 

. . . Jffltlltnerj) . . . 

Tailor-made and English Hats. Special attention to Weilesley 

Students. 



LADIES' 



296 BOYLSTON STREET 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Wies, Beards, Switches, Curls, Puffs, Etc., to Hire for Amateur Theatricals and 
all Stage Productions. Grease, Paints, Powders, Burnt Cork, Rouges, Etc. 

M. G. SLATTERY 3Eg A Mf WIGS 

226 TREMONT STREET - - - BOSTON 

Between Eliot and LaGrange Sts., Opp. Majestic Theater 

Competent Make-up Artists Special Attention Given 

Furnished to Order Work 

Tel. Oxford 657-1 

ELOCUTION RECITAL. 



The students of Elocution, Course I, gave a recital on Saturday 
afternoon, April 22, at 4.15 P.M., in College Hall Chapel. Th e 
programme was as follows : 

Doctor Luke of the Labrador, Norman Duncan, Bessie Berkebile 
Wee MacGreegor, J. J. Bill, Ida Robert s 

The Bell, J. L. Hardy, Cecilia Hollingsworth 

CEnone, Tennyson, Marguerite Staats 

An Object of Affection, Mary Wilkins, Edith Koon 

Higher Education of Women, George William Curtis, Mary Tripp 
As You Like It, William Shakespeare, Florence Talpey 

How the Camel Got his Hump, Rudyard Kipling, Ruth Van Blarcom 
The Little Minister, J. M. Barrie, Constance Block 

The Twa Sisters, An Old English Ballad, Beulah Hubbard 

L'Aiglon, Edmund Rostand, Evelyn Van der Veer 

The selections were well-chosen and delightfully rendered. 
Miss Berkebile g.ave the pleasing dialogue from "Dr. Luke of the 
Labrador" in which Skipper Tommy and his little friend consider 
the means of evading the wiles of women. Miss Berkebile was en- 
tirely at her ease while she was portraying the two charming charac- 
ters, and made one feel a keen desire to know them better. Miss 
Roberts gave the picture of the irrepressible MacGreegor and his 
parents out "oarin'"in the lake. The characters of the indulgent 
father, the cautious mother and the persistent child were well-read. 
Miss Hollingsworth's delicate voice was not strong enough to be 
impressive, but it was well suited to the poetical prose selection, 
''The Bell." Miss Staats' choice of "Qinone" was singularly 
artistic, and her rich voice was a fitting medium for the presentation 
of Tennyson's poetry, while her personality was a fitting one to por- 
tray that of the unhappy ODnone. Miss Koon read the amusing 
selection, "An Object of Affection," in which she brought out the 
pathos as well as the humor of the situation, — the spinster's loss of 
her beloved cat, Willie. Miss Tripp's choice of Curtis' "Highe r 
Education of Women' ' was not suited to the personality of the reader 
and, on that account, not impressive; but the speaking voice of the 
reader and her fineness of enunciation are commendable. In the 
scene from "As You Like It" Miss Talpey's strong, magnetic per- 
sonality was in full sympathy with Shakespeare's charmingRosalind, 
while her work showed nothing of the amateur, but was truly pro- 
fessional. Miss Van Blarcom's reading of "How the Camel Got 
his Hump" was thoroughly enjoyed. The reader, with the author, 
seemed to enjoy keen insight into animal nature, and portrayed well 
the fun-loving nature of the dog and horse, the dolefulness of the ox 
and the stolid sullenness of the camel. Miss Block was bewitching 
a s Babbie in "The Little Minister" and her sweet singing voice 
dded charm to the character of the winning little gypsy. Miss 
Hubbard gave a fine interpretation of "The Twa Sisters" and ex- 
pressed with deep feeling the wild, primitive passions of the old 
ballad. Tin 1C ene from L'Aiglon chosen by Miss Van der Veer was 
truly dramatic, emotional, without being overdrawn. Miss Van der 
Veer ha reached a finesse in her art that is far above the average. 
This selection was a fitting climax for a well-executed programme. 



telephone, 2778-1 Oxford. 



168 IRtMONT SI., BOSTON, MASS. 



NOTICE. 

Mending neatly done for students and others. Woolen skirts 
and thin gowns pressed. Lingerie shirt-waists and neck arrange- 
ments, also sofa-pillow covers laundered, if left with Mrs. Higgin- 
bottom, 8 Upland Road, Weilesley. 



ALLIANCE FRANCAISE MEETING. 



The Alliance Francaise held its last meeting of the year on 
Monday evening, April 17, at Agora House. The Easter rabbit was 
present at the meeting and had hidden many eggs in corners and 
under pillows, about the house. After all the eggs had been found, 
the great auction began. Prizes were awarded to the members who 
best performed the "stunts" named by the auctioneer. 

In honor of Mile. Carret's birthday, the refreshments included 
a large cake with her name written on it and lighted with red candles. 
The alliance expressed its best wishes to Mile. Carret, who has taken 
such a loyal interest on its work throughout this year. Tt was with 
regret that the last meeting was adjourned. 



FREE PRESS. 



Talking of educational opportunities, what about the chance, 
just half an hour away, of seeing the world? The "World in Bos- 
ton," headquarters Mechanics Hall Building, has brought together 
suggestive features of the Oriental countries, of the Mohammedan 
Lands, of Africa, and South America, with the purpose of showing 
what has been done, and what still remains to be done in civilizing 
and Christianizing these people. Missions is one of the big move- 
ments of our time; and the Boston exposition shows its scope and 
power. People are coming from all over the country to view the 
exhibits, and become informed of conditions. Can any of us, so 
near, afford to miss it? 191 2. 

PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



The sun plays hide-and-seek in the Spring 
And in all the Weilesley scenery 
Instead of fascinating greenery 

Have we brown in everything, 
And all the lovely campus trees 

Sprout botany tags instead of leaves. 



GOLD FOR THE BLUE. 

Phi Sigma Society $365-°o 

Boat Fund 5°-oo 

Auction 24.90 

Webb 5-84 

Total, 1445-74 



MISS E. R RICE, 

590 Fifth Avenue, New York, 

WILL BE AT THE 

WELLESLEY INN 

Friday and Saturday, May 5th and 6th. 

Gowns, Linen Garden Party and Gradu- 
ation Waists, Dresses. Millinery, Linen 
Garden Party and Lingerie Hats. :: :: 



COLLEGE NEWS 




Just Arrived 

SPRUNG STOCK 

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MAPWDARIPM COATS 

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A. A. VAINT1INE & CO. 

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JUNE EXAMINATIONS. 



1911. 

Conflicts should be reported to the Dean before May 10. 
Tuesday. June 6. 



9.1s A.M. 


Art 1, 3, 


A. L. R. 1 




•3. 


G. L. R. 




English Literature 2, 19, 


22 I 




Musical Theory 1, 12. 15, 


Billings Hall 




Physical Education 13, 


Hemenway Hall 


2.00 P.M. 


Botanv 1, A. C, 


Botany Annex 




B, 


B. L. 1 




4. 


B. L. 2 




5> 
Musical Theorv 7. 9, 


Billings Hall 




Philosophy 6 and 16 for .Seniors only 


426 




9. 


426 




Physics 1 for Seniors only. 


426 




Wednesday, June 7. 




9.15 A.M. 


German 30, 


G. L. R. 




Greek 13, 


G. L. R. 




Physical Education 11, 


Hemenway Hall 




Zoology 1, 


Billings Hall 




2, 5. 


426 




8, 


443 




10, 


•435 




11, 


Hemenway Hall 


2.00 P.M. 


Botan)' 3, 


B. L. 2 




English Language 1, 2, 3, 


426 




French 1, 


A. L. R. 1 







G. L. R. 




3. 5. 


Billings Hall 




7> 


321 




24. 29, 


Billings Hall 




Greek 1 for Seniors only, 4, 


22 I 




Musical Theory 8, 


22 I 




Physical Education 9, 


Hemenway Hull 



Melleslev) inn 



The Club House for 

IP e lies ley Students 



If you want the Best Canned Fruit and Vegetables 

Try Our Brands— They will Please You. 
MARTIN L. HALL & CO., - - BOSTON 

THE CONSIGNORS' UNION, Inc. 

FOOD SHOP 48 Winter Street, Boston LUNCH ROOM 

LUNCHEON 11 to 3 

AFTERNOON TEA 3 to 5 
Cake, Pastry, Bread, Etc., on Sale 



Thursday, June 8. 



IS A.M. 



235 



Biblical History 9, 

English Literature 1, Adams to Peppcrdav 

Billings Hall 

Perry to Zimmerman, A. L. R. 1 

4. C. L. R. 

6, G. L. R. 

7- 426 

8, 221 

10, G. L. R. 

15. 221 

Latin 1 for Seniors only, 20, 235 

2.00 P.M. English Composition 1, Acheson to Gove, 

Billings Hall 
Graham to Keeler, C. L. R. 
Kees to Mayo, 
Mead to Phillips 
Phirmey to Rose, 
Rowland to Spencer, 
Spofford to Titzell, 
Tolman to Ware, 
Warrant to Wolf, C. 
Wolf, G. to Wylde, 



P. L. R. 
426 
109 
235 
423 
454 
335 

G. L. R. 



German 9, 



2, Acklin to Hoxie, A. L. R. 1 
Hu to Mitchell, A. L. R. 2 
Montgomery to Ruel, 221 

Ruthven to Thomas, L., 261 
Thomas, M. to Wvman, 258 

4, ' G. L. R. 

5. 7. Hemenway Hall 
10, 321 

327 



9.15 A.M. 



2.00 P.M. 



Friday, June 9. 

Art 2, 

Economics I for Seniors only, 

Geology 5, 

German 1 , 



5. 10. 
8, 16, 

11, A, B, C, 
D, 

21. 

33. 
Physical Education 12, 
Biblical History 1 for Seniors only, 
Historv 2. 

' 3, A, B, C, 
D, E. 
4. 
7. 
13. 
14. 

20, 

Philosophy 10, 

Physical Education I, 

(Continued on page 6.) 



A. L. R. 2 
426 

426 
221 

G. L. R. 

G. L. R. 

Billings Hall 

C. L. R. 

A. L. R. 1 

Billings Hall 

426 

426 

Hemenway Hall 

321 

Billings Hall 

Billings Hall 

A. L. R. 1 

G. L. R. 

C. L. R. 

A. L. R. 1 

C. L. R. 

G. L. R. 

321 
Hemenway Hall 



COLLEGE NEWS 



}0Yftfe}(5 

On Sale at Morgan's Pharmacy, 
Clement's Pharmacy, 



CHOCOLATE 

BONBONS 



WELLESLEY 



SCALP SPECIALIST. Miss I. Blissard, D. S. C. 

Shampooing, Manicuring, Chiropody, Facial and 
Scalp Massage, Marcel Waving and Hair Dressing. 

ELECTRIC VIBRATOR TREATMENT 

THE NORMAN. Over B. B. Parker's Shoe Store 

Open evenings by appointment. 
Tel. 471L Wellesley Miss G. Taylor (Masseuse) Assistant. 



OLD NATICK INN 

South Natick, Mass. 
One mile from Wellesley College 
Brtakfaii 8 to 9 
Dinner I to 2 
Supper 6.30 to 7.30 
Tta-room open from 3 to 6 
Hot Waffles served on Mondays. 

Toasted Muffins with Jelly, Fridays. 
T»l. Natick 9212 A1ISS HARRIS, Mgr. 

JOHN A. MORGAN & CO. 

Pharmacists 

SHATTUCK BUILDING 
WELLESLEY 

WELLESLEY FRUIT STORE 

Carries a full line of Choice Fruit, 
Confectionery and other goods. Veg- 
etables of all kinds, usually found in a 
first class fruit store. Pistachio Nuts, 
especially, Olive Oil and Olives of all 
kinds. 

Free Delivery. Tel. 138-2. 

GEORGE BARKAS. 

WELLESLEY TAILORING CO. 

W. ROSEINTHAL 

Ladles' And G.nti" Custom Tailoring 

Suits Mad* to Order 

FURRIER 

543 Washington Street, Wellesley, Mass. 

Tel. 349-2 

WRIGHT & DITSON, 

High grade athletic goods 

Tennis Rackets 
Golf Clubs 
and Balls 
field Hockey 
Rowing Sweaters 
and Jerseys 

Exercising Apparatus of all kinds. 
Baseball for girls. Coat Sweat= 
ers. Gym. Shoes. Catalogue free. 
Books on all kinds of sports, 10c 
each. 

WRIGHT & DITSON, 

344 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 
22 Warren St., New York City. 
84 Wabash Ave., Chicago. 111. 
359 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 
76 Weybosset St., Providence, R. I. 
Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. 




( Continued from page 5.) 

Saturday, June io. 



9.15 A.M. 


Economics 13, 




258 




Education 6, Abbe to Francis, 




426 




Gates to Lorenz, 




261 




McKay to Skinner, 




235 




Slack to Yates, 




109 




Pure Mathematics 1, A, M, 




C. L. R. 




B, E, K, L, Q, 


T, 


Billings Hall 




C, G, 




P. L. R. 




D, 




221 




F, R, S, 




G. L. R. 




H, J, P, 




A. L. R. 1 


2.00 P.M. 


Biblical History 3, 4, 8 & 12 for Sen 


iors 


321 
only, G. L. R. 



9.15 A.M. 



5, G. L. R. 

Chemistry 1, A. L. R. 1 

4, 5, 12, C. L. R. 

Greek 3, 8, 14, 221 
Physical Education 18, Hemenway Hall 

Spanish 1, 235 
Tuesday, June 13. 

Biblical History 1 , Abbott to Littlefield, G. L. R. 

Loeber to Roessler, 426 

Rose to Zuckerman, 321 

3, C. L. R. 

4, Abbe to Knox, A. L. R. 1 
. Kramer to Saltar, P. L. R. 

Schimpeler to Zimmerman, 221 



2.00 P M. 



9.15 A.M. 



2.00 P.M. 



9.15 A.M. 



e, 10, 12, 

Physical Education 7, 
Economics I, 
Greek 1, 

Wednesday, June 14. 

Philosophy 3, 
Physical Education 3, 
Physics 1 , 
Philosophy 6, 

7, Adams to DeHart, 
Deyo to Zuckerman, 
16, 



Latin I, 
17. 



Thursday, June 15. 



NOTICE. 



Billings Hall 

Hemenway Hall 

G. L. R. 

221 



426 

Hemenway Hall 

G. L. R. 

Billings Hall 

Billings Hall 

A. L. R. 1 

G. L. R. 



L. R. 1 
221 



The attention of all students is called to the following notice: 

1 . Unless especially notified to the contrary, students should 
take to examinations neither books nor paper of any kind. 

2. Blank-books and not loose paper should be used in exam- 
inations. These books will be furnished by the examiner in the 

class-room. 

(Continued on page 7.) 



The Walnut Hill School 

NATICK, MASS. 

A College Preparatory School for Girls 

Miu Conant and Miss BIftlow 
Principals 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 North Ave., Natick 

High Grade Portraits 

Telephone 109-5 

E. B. PARKER 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 
Repair Work a Specialty 

The Norman Welleiley Sqnara 

JAMES KORNTVED 

Ladies' and Gents* 

Custom Tailor 

Shaw Block, Wellesley Sq. 

Special Attention Paid to 
Pressing and Cleaning 



TAILBY 

THE WELLESLEY FLORIST 

Office, 555 Washington St. Tal. 44-3 

Conservatories, 103 Linden St. 

Tal. 44-1 

Orders by Mall or Otherwisa are 

Given Prompt Attention. 

J. TAILBY & SON, Props. 

WelleBley, Mass. 



^e Waban 3nn 

CHOPS, STEAKS, SALADS, 
COFFEE, CHOCOLATE, 

Always ready for 
Wellesley Students 

F. DIEHL, Jr. 

BOARDING AND LIVERY STABLE, 

Hacks, Barges for Parties, Wagon 

for Straw Rides. 

Tel. 16-2. WELLESLEY. 

MR. ALBERT M. KANRICH 

Violinist and Musical Director of 
The Kanrich Band and Orchestra 

Removed to 2 1 4 Boylston St., Boston 

Orchestration Band Arrangements 

Telephone 2og3-i Back Bay 



SPIRELLA 



The Most Pliable, Comfortable and 
Healthful. Conforms to a Curved 
Seam. The Acme of Corset Perfec- 
tion. 

Sixty Distinct Ultra=Artistic Models 

Comprising Styles for Every Type of Figure in the Latest 
Front and Back Laced Creations. Spirella Corsets are well 
known and recommended at Wellesley College. 

Our Official Guarantee 

Accompanies Every Spirella Corset Sold, Guaranteeing a Duplicate 
Corset FREE Should a Spirella Stay Break or Rust in Corset Wear 
within One Year of Purchase. 

M. W. WILLEY, 420 Boylston St., s r?f ° n r d 

NEW ENGLAND MANAGER 



10^, 



\Jj 



DO YOUR FEET TROUBLE YOU? 

I have cured others, I can cure you! 



Why visit the chiropodist and obtain only relief when you may be 
cured by the Foot Specialist? Corns, bunions, callouses, ingrown nails 
and fallen arches treated and cured. Warts, moles and superfluous hair 
removed. 



Mrs. Florence McCarthy, D. S. C 

Rooms 14, 15 and 16, 9 Hamilton Place. 

My prices are the same as the chiropodist's 



The only woman Foot 
Specialist in Boston 



COLLEGE NEWS 




The Sample Shoe 
and Hosiery Shop 

Have only TWO Shopi 
in BOSTON 

496 Washington Street, Cor. 

Bedford Street, and 

74 Boylston Street, Cor. 

Tremont Street. 

(Both Stores up one Flight.) 

Our Prices, $2.00 and $2.50 a pair 

$4.00 and $5.00 grades 




$3.50, 



(Concluded from page 6.) 

IMPORTANT. 



The attention of all students is called to the following, quoted 
from the Official Circular of Information. 

"A student who is absent from an examination (or fails to hand 
in a final paper at the appointed time) must send a letter of explana- 
tion to the Dean, not later that twenty-four hours after the close 
of the last examination of the examination period. If the reason as- 
signed is judged adequate by the Academic Council, the student 
will incur a 'deficiency;' if the reason is nidged inadequate, the 
student will incur a 'default' or 'condition.' If a student fails to 
make an explanation within the time specified, the case will be 
treated as if the explanation had been inadequate. ' ' B. Art. Ill, 
Sect. 6. 

"A student who has been present at an examination long enough 
the examination paper will not be considered as absent from 
examination." B. Art. Ill, Sect. 8. 



FINAL PAPERS JUNE, 1911. 



Tuesday, June 6. 

Am. All final papers due not later than I 1.30 A.M. 
BOTANY. All final papers due not later than 4.15 P.M. 

Wednesday, June 7. 

English Language. All final papers due not later than 4.15 P.M.. 
French. All final papers due not later than 4.15 P.M. 

Thursday, June 8. 

English Literature. All final papers due not later than 11.30 

A.M. 
English Composition. All final papers due not later than 4.15 

P.M 

Friday, June 9. 

German. All final papers due not later than 11.30 A.M. 
Economics. All final papers required of Seniors due not later than 

11.30 A.M. 
Physical Education. All final papers required of special students 

due not later than 1 1.30 A.M. 
History. All final papers due not later than 4.15 P.M. 

Saturday, June 10. 

Education. All final papers due not later than 11.30 A.M. 

Italian. All final papers due not later than 11.30 A.M. 

Pure Mathematics. All final papers due not later than 11.30 A.M. 

Chemistry. All final papers due not later than 4.15 P.M. 

Greek. All final papers due not later than 4.15 P.M. 

Latin. All final papers required of Seniors due not later than 4.15 

P.M. 
Philology. All final papers dus not later than 4.15 P.M. 
Philosophy. All final papers required of Seniors due not later 

than 4.15 P.M. 
Spanish. All final papers due not later than 4.15 P.M. 



Bailey, Banks c£ Biddle Co. 

MAKERS OF 

WELLESLEV COLLEGE PINS 

College Organizations contemplating the purchase of Emblems 
are invited to write for designs, samples and prices. With the 
workshops on the premises, this company is enabled to furnish 
emblems of the best grade of workmanship and finish at the 
lowest prices consistent with work of this high quality. 

COLLEGE AND SCHOOL EMBLEMS 

An Illustrated Catalogue Mailed Free on Request 

1218-20-22 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



FOR SALE. An evening gown of light blue silk, beautiful, 
simple and perfect, and a dainty dancing dress, unusual and spe- 
cially choice. Best Boston make. Sizes of each: Bust, 36 in.; 
belt, 23 in.; neck, 13 in.; front length of skirt, 41 in. 

ALSO: A complete riding-outfit habit. Same measurements; 
dark blue, fine cloth, gauntlets, Derby, whip and boots, 4 ] j A 
For particulars, enquire of 

THE MISSES HASTINGS, 

38 Dover Street, Wellesley, Mass. 



FOR SALE. Two finest Italian mandolins, most celebrated 
make. Selected by professors in Florence and Rome. Enquire of 
THE MISSES HASTINGS, 

38 Dover Street, Wellesley, Mass. 



Tuesday, June 13. 

Hygiene. All final papers required in the Freshman course due 

not later than 1 1.30 P.M. 
Economics. Final papers required of all students, except Seniors. 

due not later than 4.15 P.M. 

Wednesday, June 14. 

Philosophy. Final papers required of all students, except Seniors, 
due not later than 4.15 P.M. 

Thursday, June 15. 

Latin. Final papers required of all students, except Seniors, due 

not later than 1 1.30 A.M. 



IMPORTANT. 



The attention of all students is called to the following quoted 
from the Official Circular of Information. 

"A student who is absenf From an examination for fails to 
hand in a final paper at the appointed time) must send a lot' - oi 
explanation to the Dean not later than twenty-four hours after 
the close of the last examination of the examination period. If the 
reason assigned is judged adequate by the Academic Council, the 
Student will incur a 'deficiency;' if the reason is judged inadequate, 
the student will incur a 'default' or 'condition.' If a student fail - 1 1 1 
make an explanation within the time specified, the ease will be 
treated as if the explanation had been inadequate." B. Art. III. 
Sect. 6. 

FOREIGN PHOTOGRAPHS, 



The Department of Art will be very glad to order unmounted 
photographs from abroad, for any member of the college. This will 
be the last opportunity of tin year and in order to receive the prints 
before Commencement all orders must be handed in before Wednes- 
day, May 17. 

Illustrated catalogues may be consulted in the Art Library and 
the attendants will bs pi :ased to l> of vice in making selections. 
Payments must lie made in advance in evei 



COLLEGE NEWS 



L. P. HOLLANDER & CO. 

BOSTON NEW YORK 

Young Ladies' Negligee Shirts 

Orders taken in our Men's Furnishing Goods Department. 

IMPORTED ^— 

Silks, $5.00 upward Flannel, $5.00 upward 

Madras and Cheviot, $4.00 

202=216 Boylston Street, = = = = Boston. 



IN MEMORY OF EVELYN S. HALL. 



Since Wellesley's. first Commencement, when eighteen girls 
received the degree of their young Alma Mater, and the Class of 
1879 went out into the world, only twice has the little circle been 
broken. In 1883 the President of the Class, Mary Allison Bingham, 
— "Mcllie," brilliant and beloved — passed into "the fulness of 
joy." At its next reunion, Evelyn S. Hall was chosen to fill the 
vacant place. On Good Friday last, her beautiful and beneficent 
life was closed. 

The fellowship of the Class throughout the thirty-one years 
has been intimate. From New England and the Southland to far- 
away India, the messages of the unfailing Class Letter have been 
the bond of an ever closer friendship, in the deepening experiences 
of life. In the derith of the President, dearly loved and greatiy 
honoied, the Class finds tender and inexpressible sorrow. 

When in 1883 Mr. Dwight L. Moody was seeking at Wellesley 
College a principal, able to carry out his high ideals for Northfield 
Seminary, the thoughts of Miss Freeman naturally turned to Evelyn 
Hall, then teaching in a private school in Chicago. It is pleasant 
to think that her Alma Mater thus called her to that position of 
wide usefulness, which for twenty-seven years she so nobly filled. 
Upon thousands of eager girls her sweet and strong character has 
made an enduring impression, as she has led them in the ways of 
wisdom, where they have met her Master and theirs. All around 
the world the daughters of Northfield "rise up and call her blessed." 

But to her classmates, memory is recalling the lovely traits 
of her own girlhood, which the years have but strengthened, — the 
purity and simplicity of her spirit, the delight in beauty and the 
ability to find it everywhere, the power of intense practicality, the 
quick response of sympathy to joy and sorrow, the clear vision and 
steadfast devotion of her Christian faith. 

The Book of Providence is not yet unsealed. The meaning of 
the months of pain, with which that life, so gentle, so loving, so 
trustful, has closed, is among the mysteries, which may be solved 
only " in the school-room of the sky. " For her the pathway of suffer- 
ing has ended at the gates of the Celestial City. "Blessed are the 
pure in heart, for they shall see God." 

For the Class of '79, 

Louise M. North, 
Annie Sybil Montague. 



ALUMNA NOTES. 



In addition to notes concerning graduates, the Alumna; 
column will contain items of interest about members of the 
Faculty, past and present, and former students. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

Miss Edith W. Bryant, 1909, to Mr. George Myron Belcher, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1908, of Maiden, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Miss Marjory M. Clark, 1909. to Mr. William Clyde Westcott, 
Princeton, 1906, of Union City, Pennsylvania. 



Miss Harriet Elizabeth Hinchliff, 1910, to Mr. William Hugh 
Coverdale, of New York Cit)'. 

Miss Eva A. Pierce, of the Class of 191 1, to Mr. Henry M. 

Shreve, of Salem, Massachusetts. 



MARRIAGES. 

Nicoll — Heber. March 14, 1911, in Los Angeles, California. 
Miss Alice Ethel Heber, 1906, to Mr. Clark Henry Nicoll, of San 
Francisco, California. 

Wilson — Tyler. April 16, 191 1, in Williamsburg, Virginia, 
Miss Julia Gardiner Tyler, 1904, to Mr. James Southall Wilson. 

McKeever — Bradfield. April 19, 1911, in Barnesville, Ohio, 
Miss Maude Caldwell Bradfield, 1907, to Mr. John Herbert Mc- 
Keever. At home after July 1, 1001 Lincoln Street, Aberdeen, 
South Dakota. 

Libby' — Brazier. April 20, 191 1, Miss Hattie Payson Brazier, 
1909, to Mr. Ralph Garfield Libby. At home, 234 State Street, 
Portland, Maine. 

BIRTHS. 

September 2, 1910, in Ironwood, Michigan, a son, Clark Thomp- 
son, to Mrs. Pearson Wells, (Helen Pillsbury, 1905). 

April 1, 1911, in Denver, Colorado, a son, Ralph Lathrop, Jr., 
to Mrs. Ralph L. Paddock, (Susanna T. Annin, 1909). 

April 8, 1911, in Holliston, Massachusetts, a daughter, Margery, 
to Mrs. Samuel Hunter, (Ethel Ambler, 1909). 

April 23, 191 1, in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, a son, Wallace 
Browne, to Mrs. Harold Arthur Gilbert, (Sara Mary Brown, 1902) 



DEATHS. 

March 17, 191 1, in Somerville, Massachusetts, Mrs. S. Z. Bow- 
man, mother of Mabel E. Bowman, 1897, and of Ethel Bowman, 1900. 

April 22, 191 1, in New York City, Mrs. C. Irving Fisher, 
mother of Gertrude G. Fisher, 1909. 

April 26, 191 1, in Andover, Massachusetts, Miss Lucia F 
Clark, Instructor in Latin and Bible, 1875-1897, and Superintendent' 
of Simpson Cottage, 1882-1900. 



CHANGES OF ADDRESS. 

Mrs. Wendell Phillips Raine, (Alice Elizabeth Chase, 1900)^ 
4108 Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Goldsmith H. Conant, (Cora L. Butler, 1909), Westford, 
Massachusetts. 

Mrs. Andrew S. Hunter, Jr., (Vena S. Batty, 1906), 561 Pros- 
peel Street, Utica, New York. 

Miss Lucy Mapes, 1906, and Miss Belle Mapes, 1910, 21 East 
Concord Avenue, Kansas City, Missouii. 

Mrs. F. Ernest Winslow, (Helen W. Bates, 1907), 9 Mt. Vernon 
Avenue, Braintree, Massachusetts. 

Mrs. Stuart R. Cecil, (Lucile Drummond, 1908), 521 Belgravia, 
Louisville Kentucky.